Saferfarms.org.nz
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Working well: Health and safety in your vineyard and winery

This guide is about protecting the productivity of your vineyard or winery and the lifestyle you enjoy.

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Key points

This guide will help you work out:

  • the best way for you to identify, manage and communicate health and safety risks to workers
  • what part other people on vineyards or wineries should play in risk management.
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Keep Safe, Keep Farming guide

How to be healthy and safe on farm to protect the productivity of your farm and the lifestyle you enjoy.

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Key points

  • the best way for you to identify, manage and communicate health and safety risks to family and workers
  • what part other people on farm should play in risk management.
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A guide to developing safety management systems

The purpose of these guidelines is to help farmers establish and operate a safety management system for their farm.

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Summary

Farmers need to manage health and safety in a way that is appropriate for the needs of themselves, their staff and visitors to the farm. This guide will take you through the key components of a safety management system.

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Safe Sheep Shearing

The purpose of these guidelines provide advice on how to keep people safe in the shearing industry.

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Key points

  • Be aware of your responsibilities in and around the shearing shed.
  • Check shearing and crutching equipment regularly.
  • Use correct techniques when manually handling and shearing sheep.
  • Always wash and dry hands after contact with sheep to avoid diseases humans can catch from animals (zoonoses).

Key concepts to understand before reading these guidelines

What and who is a PCBU?

A ‘PCBU’ refers to a person conducting a business or undertaking. A PCBU can be an individual such as a farmer or independent shearer, or an organisation (eg a company).

The difference between a PCBU and a worker

There is a clear difference between a PCBU and a worker when the PCBU is a company or organisation. However, when an individual person is a PCBU, (eg self-employed) the difference may be less clear.

When a self-employed person is working for themselves, eg a self-employed shearer (who dictates how their work is done and creates, and controls, risks) they are a PCBU. However, if a self-employed person is working for another PCBU (eg a contractor who controls what they do and how and when they do it) then they are a worker under that PCBU.

Example: Zac, a self-employed shearing contractor, has agreed to help out his mate Fabian who runs a shearing team. Both are PCBUs. Because Zac is going to be working for Fabian and Fabian will be controlling what, when, and how he works, even though he is a PCBU himself, Zac would be treated as a worker because Fabian is determining the work and controlling the risks that arise from that work.

What does reasonably practicable mean?

The term ‘reasonably practicable’ appears throughout HSWA. ‘Reasonably practicable’ is used to qualify duties to ensure health and safety.

There is no such thing as zero risk. The PCBU is not expected to guarantee the safety of their workers and others from work activities. Instead, PCBUs are held to a ‘reasonably practicable’ standard.

It is a judgement call the PCBU must make. It involves weighing a risk against the resources (time and cost) needed to manage it.

Something is reasonably practicable if it is, or was, at a particular time, reasonably able to be done to ensure health and safety, having weighed up and considered all relevant matters, including:

  • How likely is a hazard or risk to occur?
  • How severe could the harm that might result from the hazard or risk be?
  • What the person concerned knows or ought to reasonably know about the hazard or risk and the ways of eliminating or minimising the risk (eg by removing the source of the risk or using control measures such as isolation or physical controls to minimise it).
  • What measures exist to eliminate or minimise the risk (control measures)?
  • How available and suitable is the control measure(s)?

Lastly weigh up the cost:

  • What is the cost of eliminating or minimising the risk?
  • Is the cost grossly disproportionate to the risk?

For more information see the WorkSafe website.

 

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Managing health and safety: A guide for farmers

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • IDENTIFY all significant hazards on your farm
  • If you can, ELIMINATE the hazards
  • If you can’t eliminate the hazards, ISOLATE them
  • If you can’t eliminate or isolate hazards, MINIMISE them
  • MONITOR hazards regularly
  • Record significant hazards, controls and monitoring in a HAZARD REGISTER
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Preventing manual handling injuries on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries from manual handling on farms by providing...

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Key points

  • Workers must be trained in correct techniques for manual handling jobs
  • No one should lift something that is too heavy for them
  • Lift with the legs, not the back
  • (Re)design the workplace to minimise manual handling hazards
  • Use mechanical / lifting aids where possible
  • Plan regular breaks and rotate jobs
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Preventing noise induced hearing loss on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of hearing loss by providing practical guidance on how...

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Key points

  • Keep noise levels below 85dB(A) on average and 140dB at peak
  • If possible replace machinery that creates noise above these levels
  • If you can’t replace the machinery reduce exposure to it
  • Wear hearing protection if noise levels are still too high
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Preventing slips, trips and falls on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries by providing guidance on how to prevent...

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Key points

  • Keep work areas clean, dry and tidy
  • Use footwear with good tread
  • Always use three points of contact on ladders or when mounting/dismounting tractors and mobile plant
  • Arrange work areas to minimise slip, trip and fall hazards: eg use rubber mats
  • Find ways to do tasks from the ground, rather than at heights
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Safe use of quad bikes

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Riders must be trained/experienced enough to do the job
  • Choose the right vehicle for the job
  • Always wear a helmet
  • Don't let kids ride quad bikes
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Riding horses on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Only trained and experienced people should ride horses for farm work
  • Match riders to horses within their handling abilities
  • Always wear a helmet when riding a horse
  • Always supervise children on/and around horses
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Safe cattle handling

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Anyone working with cattle must be appropriately trained and experienced for the task
  • Keep yards tidy and well maintained
  • Plan an escape route in advance when working with cattle in the yards
  • Never get in the race with large cattle. Don’t put your arms or legs through the race walls
  • Don’t try to move a dangerous bull on foot or alone
  • Always wash and dry your hands after working with cattle
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Safe sheep handling

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Anyone working with sheep must be appropriately trained or experienced for the task
  • Keep yards and woolsheds tidy and well maintained
  • Before working with sheep in the yards, leave them for 30 minutes to calm down
  • Avoid lifting sheep if possible. If you have to, use your legs, not your back
  • Always wash and dry your hands after working with sheep
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Safe use of tractors on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Operators must be trained/experienced enough to do the job
  • Always wear a seatbelt if the tractor has a Roll-Over Protective Structure (ROPS)
  • Do not carry passengers on tractors that do not have instructor seats, ROPS, and safety belts
  • Ensure PTO shafts and connections are guarded and keep clear when it is engaged
  • Never jump on or off a moving tractor
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Safe use of two-wheeled motorbikes on farms

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Riders must be trained/experienced enough to do the job
  • Choose the right vehicle for the job
  • Always wear a helmet
  • Don’t allow children to ride adult-sized farm bikes
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Safe use of elevating work platforms in the horticulture industry

The purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on safe work practices for the use and maintenance of horticultural mobile...

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Summary

Horticultural mobile elevating work platforms (H/MEWP) are complex pieces of equipment that are used in hazardous conditions. These guidelines outline the obligations of duty holders under the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 (HSE Act), and summarise the relevant part of the industry standards

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Staying safe in and around farm dairies

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Design the farm dairy to let workers milk in a comfortable position, between shoulder and mid-thigh
  • Install kick rails
  • Guard rotary platform rollers
  • Fence off all effluent ponds
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A Guide to Safety with Chainsaws

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on...

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Key points

  • Only professionals should attempt complex felling.
  • Use the right chainsaw and PPE for the task and maintain it correctly
  • Make sure you use your chainsaw properly, and consider getting training in basic chainsaw skills
  • Be aware of main hazards of chainsaw use – kickback, hearing loss, vibration disease, and CO poisoning.
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Above Ground Fuel Storage on Farms

This good practice guide will help farmers comply with the health, safety and environmental laws for above ground fuel storage.

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Key points

  • Give people handling the fuel safety information
  • Make sure everyone handling the fuel knows the hazards and how to keep safe

  • Have procedures for managing fuel-related emergencies

  • Get test certificates and keep them up-to-date.

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Working Safely with Chemicals and Fuels on Farms

This good practice guideline helps farmers comply with the health, safety and environmental laws for chemicals and fuels.

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Key points

For safe farm chemical and fuel use, the person in charge must:

  • Give people handling the chemicals and fuels safety information and training
  • Make sure everyone handling the chemicals and fuels knows the hazards and how to keep safe
  • Make sure chemicals and fuels are stored and used correctly
  • Have procedures for managing emergencies.
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Prevention and Control of Leptospirosis

This good practice guide provides practical suggestions for managing and preventing leptospirosis, an infectious occupational zoonotic disease.

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Key points

  • Leptospirosis is easy to catch from an infected animal and its environment
  • Protect yourself, your family and staff by vaccinating your animals, controlling rodents, practising good personal hygiene, using protective equipment, and seeking help early if you feel unwell
  • A robust animal vaccination programme is critical to break the cycle of infection, which includes understanding farm management risk factors
  • Animal vaccination guidelines have been recently updated
  • Cases of leptospirosis should be reported to WorkSafe New Zealand
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Safe Use of Self-Propelled Agricultural Plant

The purpose of these guidelines is to help reduce the risk of injuries and fatalities by providing practical guidance on the safe use...

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Key points

  • Keep three points of contact while mounting or dismounting

  • Avoid blockages

  • Ensure machinery has stopped before attempting to clear blockages by hand

  • Ensure guards and shields are in place
  • Perform regular maintenance and cleaning
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Safe Deer Handling

This good practice guide will help farmers improve safety around farmed deer by providing practical guidance on their safe handling.

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Key points

  • Always take special care around stags
  • Antlers should be removed
  • Use the right personal protective equipment
  • Ensure yards and handling areas are well designed
  • Practise good hygiene and maintain a vaccination/pest control programme
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Fasting of Sheep Prior to Shearing

This good practice guideline covers the emptying out (fasting) of sheep prior to shearing.

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Key points

  • This guideline has been designed according to scientific research and industry best practice
  • Shearing empty sheep can help reduce pen stain
  • Empty sheep can reduce already significant loads for shearing and woolshed staff to handle
  • Emptying sheep prior to shearing will not compromise animal welfare or lamb development
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