Stationary container system compliance certificates

You must have a compliance certificate for stationary container systems holding hazardous substances above certain quantities. A compliance certificate certifies that your tank or process container and associated equipment is safe and complies with the rules.

What is a stationary container system?

A stationary container system is a tank or a process container together with its associated pipe work and fittings normally located in one place. 

Read more on stationary container systems:

Types of compliance certificates

You may need both a stationary container system compliance certificate for your tank or process container and a location compliance certificate for your tank or process container.

Stationary container system compliance certificate

We have produced guidance to help you work out if your stationary container system needs a compliance certificate.

See our quick guide:

Certifying stationary container systems (PDF 58 KB)

You can also use the flowchart below:

[image] flow chart showing the process for getting a stationary container system compliance certificate

What are the threshold requirements for a stationary container system compliance certificate?

Requirements for stationary tanks

You must have a stationary container system compliance certificate for your tank if it is:

  • a below ground tank (including tanks that are covered by earth or other material) holding more than 250 L
  • an above ground tank, holding more than 2,500 L of class 3.1A and 3.1B substances (eg petrol or solvents)
  • an above ground tank, holding more than 5,000 L of substances other than class 3.1A or 3.1B (eg diesel, caustic soda and corrosives)
  • an above ground tank, holding more than 500 L of gas
  • used with a vapouriser, or
  • used with a dispenser.
  • a tank that provides fuel to an oil burning installation which has a capacity greater than:
    • 500 litres for a class 3.1D substances (eg diesel and waste oil) supplying an internal combustion engine
    • 50 litres for class 3.1A, 3.1B and 3.1C substances (eg petrol) supplying an internal combustion engine
    • 60 litres for class 3.1 flammable substances supplying a burner 
  • a tank that provides fuel to an oil burning installation with a service tank.

Requirements for process containers

You must have a stationary container system compliance certificate for your process container if it is:

  • below ground (including process containers that are covered by earth or other material) of any size
  • above ground, greater than 250 L and intended for use with a hazardous gas, or
  • above ground, greater than 1,000 L and intended for use with a hazardous liquid.

You don’t need a compliance certificate if:

  • your process container is made from fire-resistant material and complies with the Health and Safety in Employment (Pressure Equipment, Cranes and Passenger Ropeways) Regulations 1999, or
  • your tank contains LPG.

Even if your stationary container system doesn’t need a compliance certificate, it still needs to meet certain legal requirements. Contact a compliance certifier(external link) or WorkSafe New Zealand to find out what these requirements are.

Location compliance certificate

Location compliance certificates apply to workplaces where flammable, oxidising, toxic or corrosive substances are present in quantities above certain thresholds.

A location compliance certificate certifies that the location where hazardous substances are used and stored are compliant with the Regulations.

Use the hazardous substances calculator(external link) to find out whether you need a compliance certificate for your tank or process container. If you need one, you must arrange for a compliance certifier(external link) to visit your workplace.

Compliance plans

What is a compliance plan?

If your tank or process container was constructed before 1 July 2006, and doesn’t comply with the requirements for a compliance certificate, you might need a compliance plan. A compliance plan is not an approval for a stationary container system, but is a way to meet compliance requirements.

How to get a compliance plan

1. Have your stationary tank or process container assessed.

A compliance certifier will examine your stationary container system and identify anything that doesn’t comply with the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017. 

The compliance certifier provides a report on the system, including how well the system has been maintained and repaired in accordance with its original design standard if known.

2. Apply for a compliance plan

Once the compliance certifier has examined and reported on the stationary container system, an application for a compliance plan may be made.

You, or the compliance certifier, need to complete the application below.

Application for approval of a stationary container system compliance plan (PDF 318 KB)

If you have a valid stationary container compliance certificate, you can apply for an extension:

Application for increased validity period of a stationary container compliance certificate (PDF 685 KB)